Category: Interviews

Dawson’s Creek cast reunites for its 20th anniversary on this week’s EW cover

OMG! Okay I will admit to total fangirling when I saw that Entertainment Weekly got our favorite Capeside residents back together for a reunion!

You no longer have to wait. For the first time since the 2003 finale, the cast of one of the most iconic, beloved, and meme-worthy teen dramas ever, Dawson’s Creek, has reunited, thanks to Entertainment Weekly. “I think we’ve all sort of seen each other over the years, but not everybody all together,” says Katie Holmes. “And never for long enough.” Adds creator Kevin Williamson (Scream), “I run into James and Josh, Katie, Michelle, and I just get a big smile on my face. It’s just a very, very special time in my life.”

The cast — Holmes (Joey Potter), James Van Der Beek (Dawson Leery), Joshua Jackson (Pacey Witter), Michelle Williams (Jen Lindley), Busy Phillips (Audrey Liddell), Kerr Smith (Jack McPhee), Meredith Monroe (Andie McPhee), and Mary Beth Peil (Evelyn “Grams” Ryan) — sat down for EW’s cover story and video reunion, streaming now on PeopleTV.com or through the PeopleTV app, on March 12 in New York City. Looking back, Van Der Beek recalls the time during season 4 when he got lost trying to show his parents the Leery house in Wilmington, N.C., which stood in for fictional Capeside. That small-town location bonded this cast more than your typical television series. “It was like growing up together,” remembers Monroe. “I felt like I was so grateful that it was shooting in Wilmington. We all got to really connect in a way that I don’t think we would have had we been in New York or L.A.”

The series, which ran on The WB from 1998 to 2003 and is now streaming in its entirety on Hulu, was both a sweet nod to coming-of-age stories and a bold and sometimes controversial addition to the teen genre. Budding filmmaker Dawson, goofy troublemaker Pacey, moody tomboy Joey, and reformed-ish bad girl Jen all discover the joy and (mostly) pain of first love as they date and break up and date and break up… and date and break up, all with the titular body of water as a soothing backdrop. Love triangles and rectangles are nothing new, but Creek’s delivery of these topics was shockingly fresh. These pubescent pals weren’t going to the Peach Pit for shakes — they were talking about masturbating to Katie Couric and having affairs with their teachers. And they spoke about their hormonal escapades (or lack thereof) in smart, Aaron Sorkin-esque dialogue. Says John Wesley Shipp, who played Dawson’s father, Mitch: “I remember a big star who shall remain nameless said to Kevin, ‘Young people don’t talk like that.’ Kevin said, ‘Well, maybe not, but they’d like to.’ We had a feeling that we were pioneering a different way of telling stories about young people.” Adds Jackson, “Kevin never insulted the audience and never insulted [the actors] by dumbing us down. I loved that part.”

And the show’s young stars, especially the main four leads, all became overnight teen icons. “I was actually with James when he signed his first autograph,” remembers Mary-Margaret Humes, who played Dawson’s mother, Gail. “My husband and I had taken James up to Universal City in L.A. to watch a movie. This girl came up to James and said, ‘Excuse me, aren’t you that guy on Dawson’s Creek? May I have your autograph?’ He signed it and said, ‘Oh my God, Mary-Margaret, that was my first!’ And, of course, my thought was ‘Oh, honey, hang on.’”

But it’s not surprising to see such passionate fan reactions. Creek was a series that wore its heart on its sleeve and spoke to a generation. “It was really wholesome and it was really Americana,” says Greg Berlanti (Riverdale), who began his career on season 2 and took over showrunner duties in season 3. “I think if people want a perfect snapshot of what it was like to come of age in the ’90s and be a young person in that moment, Dawson’s will always be a time capsule of that.” Adds Williams: “I loved that we were able to get in there in those formative years for people. That’s why people, I think, are so connected to it. When something affects you while you were growing up, it kind of stays in there forever. When you’re so permeable and open and trying to figure out who you are and what’s going on, whatever reaches you in those moments really becomes part of you.”

To see the entire interview go to PeopleTV.

Katie Holmes Could Probably Definitely Kick Your Ass

Everyone’s favorite Dawson’s Creek star is newly into weight lifting and boxing.

I’d heard the rumors: Katie Holmes some serious biceps. I needed proof.

We’re at a swank lounge in NYC’s Mandarin Oriental hotel, where expensively groomed guests are sipping artisan cocktails. Katie, clutching her ever-present paper coffee cup, is more casual: jeans, a frilly denim shirt, sneakers. I decide to give it a shot and obnoxiously ask her to flex for me.

She is apologetic, saying, “I haven’t worked out for awhile.” But then she pulls up her sleeve and displays the startling combination of litheness and sinew she’s developed while prepping for a new role—an action-thriller, still under wraps, in which she plays an ex-marine. (It’s been a busy year, including the current Dear Dictator with Michael Caine and Ocean’s Eight, coming out this summer.)

Katie has called her new character a “warrior” in the press, and considering her life over the past few years, you get the feeling that concept personally resonates. I first interviewed Katie in 2003, right at the end of Dawson’s Creek, and the woman before me today is not far removed from that girl of 15 years ago: sunny, wry, and ebullient, with the melting brunette beauty that inspired makeup guru Bobbi Brown to call her “the modern-day Ali MacGraw.”

Could that glow have something to do with her reported relationship with actor Jamie Foxx?

Whatever the source, these days Katie is reveling in the strength of her upcoming role, having snipped her long, dark locks into a pixie and started lifting weights to develop her upper body. “Which I’ve never wanted to do,” she laughs. “But I wanted to be authentic to a person who trained in the military. Which means someone who wasn’t always paying attention to the mirror and who was in shape not for vanity, but because that’s what her job called for.”

So the new tagline is “Katie Holmes kicks ass”? It doesn’t sound as natural as “Katie Holmes bakes cookies” or even “Katie Holmes has a stuffed animal collection” (“I still love stuffed animals,” she admits). But she’s working on it.

And it is work. She would be lying if she told you that exercise is dear to her heart. Here is The Stars Are Just Like Us, Exercise Edition: Katie Holmes doesn’t really love to work out just for the sake of working out. (She also doesn’t love copping to that fact—but we relate there, too.) She does have a lot to live up to in that department.

Katherine Noelle Holmes grew up in Toledo, Ohio, the youngest of five kids in a family of jocks; she spent her youth with crayons and paper, drawing in drafty gyms while she cheered on her siblings in basketball. She sang and danced her way through high school.

But when her dad decided, at 45, to run the Boston Marathon for the first time, with her older brother, she paid attention. “I was 13 or 14, and I was like, ‘Wow.’ That had a huge impact.” So much so that in her twenties, Katie trained for and ran the New York City Marathon. “I thought, My gosh, I want to do that. If they can do it, I’m not gonna let them have that over me.”

She hasn’t felt the need to repeat the feat, but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t cool. “It was incredible, going through all the different boroughs. You feel like you’re part of a pack, and you’re inspired by other people—and the people in wheelchairs. But it’s also. . .I remember hitting mile 20 and just crying, like, ‘There’s no way—I can’t do six more miles.’ But I did.”

Nowadays, working out is usually a group activity—classes, especially SoulCycle—”because I like that sense of community,” Katie explains. Being surrounded by other people adds an element of inspiration, “like, if she can do it, I can do it too.”

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Katie Holmes on Playing Jackie O, a Dawson’s Creek Reunion and What’s Next

Dawson’s Creek alum Katie Holmes, 38, reprises her role as the iconic tragic first lady in Reelz’s second series about the famed family in The Kennedys: After Camelot, premiering Sunday night. The four-part series follows Jackie after the assassination of her husband, through her marriage to Greek millionaire Aristotle Onassis and until her death in 1994.

How is Jackie different than when you played her in The Kennedys in 2011?

She has the weight of the world on her, with the passing of her husband, and then Bobby Kennedy’s death and Chappaquiddick. There’s just so much more tragedy in this series than she experienced in the series before.

In The Kennedys: After Camelot, you have a lot of scenes as Jackie with your “son,” John Junior. What kind of mom do you think Jackie Kennedy was?

From everything that I’ve read and the people that I’ve talked to, being a mother was so important to her: protecting her children, keeping their faith, keeping them grounded, giving them the best education, and helping them into the world having the Kennedy last name. I think she was a wonderful mother, and I think that that was her priority. She worked very hard at it.

We tried to show the good days and the bad days, the different challenges and how much she was a real mom like other moms. Even though they lived in such heightened circumstances, she was still dealing with a kid who ran away from home and who didn’t do well at school. These are problems that other people can relate to. It was important for us to show those real human moments just to show that she was very much involved and how much she cared for her children.

Was motherhood an aspect of Jackie that you can relate to, being a mom yourself?

I think that what we tried to achieve with these four episodes was finding different points where we could relate to all of these different characters. We tried to show a family drama, a family that is affected by loss, a family that’s affected by power, and a mother trying to raise her children on her own. We tried to strip away the Kennedy part of it and show real human interaction, people going through tragic circumstances and being there for each other, then fighting with each other and trying to get through it. So hopefully when people watch it, they can see maybe some of their experiences in that.

Do you think Jackie loved Aristotle Onassis or just wanted someone to take care of her?

I felt like she was very much in love with him, and he brought her a happiness that she really needed. She had been so sad and in so much pain; I felt her feelings for him were very genuine.

You directed the third episode of The Kennedys: After Camelot. Was there a particular reason you selected that one, and why did you want to direct?

I had just directed my first movie, All We Had, and I was excited to direct again. I wanted to direct this particular episode because it was a lot about Ted and Joan Kennedy and Chappaquiddick. I was lighter in that episode as an actor, and I was excited to be a part of shaping those performances for that particular time, and I liked the storyline, so I chose that one.

What can you say about your role in next year’s all-female Ocean’s Eight, with Dakota Fanning, Sandra Bullock, Anne Hathaway, Rihanna and Olivia Munn?

It was so much fun. I did a little cameo playing myself. I had a great time.

Are you up to revisit Dawson’s Creek for a reunion?

We get asked that a lot, and it’s so flattering. Our last episode took place five years after the episode prior, so our finale was like a reunion. I think it’s been done.

What’s next for you?

I’m finishing shooting Logan Lucky with Channing Tatum, and I’m adapting a book called Rare Objects for the screen. I will direct and star in that. Also, I have a movie called Coup D’etat with Michael Caine coming out either this spring or summer.

(Source)

Katie Holmes Admits She’s an ‘Intense’ Basketball Fan That Trash Talks

ET Online highlights Katie’s love of the game!

Katie Holmes is a sports fan you don’t want to mess with.

The 38-year-old actress appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on Wednesday, when she talked about her love of basketball … and how she isn’t above taking things to the next level.

“I’m a big basketball fan, I come from a big basketball family,” she explained. “My dad played at Marquette under Al McGuire, so everyone is, like, very good in my family except for me. But we were just at the NCAA this weekend at MSG and it was incredible. We watched the South Carolina-Florida game, and the Florida-Wisconsin game … oh my God!”

Holmes said she even prays and does rituals before the games.

“I’m a very intense fan no matter what, because I’m the youngest of five, so I used to go to all my brothers and sisters’ games when I was little, so … I pray, I do rituals,” she said. “And my nephew was on a great basketball team this year, and I would listen on the radio and I would have to, you know, run on the treadmill because I would be so, like, ‘Oh my God, oh my God! It’s two minutes left! Oh my God!’ you know?”

She of course dials up the intensity if she’s actually at the game.

“And then if I’m there, I’m not above yelling anything I want at that ref,” she said unapologetically. “Like, ‘You’re ugly! You suck! I hate you!’ … just to distract. “You’re so mean! Those pants are too tight!’ You know, anything. I just want to be a part of it.”

Holmes also briefly talked about almost nabbing Sarah Michelle Gellar’s now iconic Buffy the Vampire Slayer role when she was still in high school.

“I was a junior in high school, and I went out to L.A. for a pilot season, and I tried out for Buffy the Vampire Slayer and … the scheduling … well, it didn’t work out,” she shared. “I got close and then a year later, they were casting Dawson’s Creek, so it was weird… and now it’s Buffy’s 20th reunion.”

“She [Gellar] was amazing in that,” she added.

Later, Holmes took part in Fallon’s adorable Pup Quiz with Girls star Andrew Rannells, where she got to cuddle with a few super cute puppies.

Clearly, Holmes isn’t exaggerating when it comes to her love of basketball. Last week, she made sure her 10-year-old daughter, Suri, got in on the NCAA March Madness fun, when she took her to a Notre Dame basketball game at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York.

Check out Holmes’ hilariously intense face watching the game in the video below!

Katie Holmes reveals the message to her daughter Suri in her new movie

Katie did an interview with the Business Insider on her new film “All We Had” and talked about how she dedicates this film to her daughter Suri.

Katie Holmes has gone through many phases in her career. We first fell for her as the pretty girl next door on the late-’90s series “Dawson’s Creek.” Then she suddenly became one of the most recognized faces in the world thanks to her marriage to Tom Cruise in the early 2000s (they divorced in 2012). Now she’s forging a new chapter as a filmmaker.

After two short films — a 2014 AOL original on women who inspire her and the 2015 ESPN “30 for 30” “Eternal Princess” on Olympic gymnast Nadia Comaneci — Holmes, 37, has made an impressive feature debut with “All We Had” (opening in theaters and on VOD on Friday). Based on the Annie Weatherwax novel of the same name, it stars Holmes as Rita, a down-and-out mom who leaves the man she’s with to start a new life with her daughter, Ruthie (Stefania LaVie Owen).

Business Insider talked to Holmes about the challenges of making her first feature film, if she has any regrets about walking away from the Christopher Nolan-directed Batman franchise, and why she dedicated “All We Had” to her daughter, Suri.

Jason Guerrasio: When did you catch the directing bug?

Katie Holmes: I think it was around the time of doing those shorts. [Producer] Christine Vachon, I had a meeting with her, and she mentioned the short, this AOL short, and asked if I wanted to do one. Once I had an idea of what to do and how to do it and actually did it, I was like, “Oh, I can do that. That wasn’t so bad.” And then the next step was the “30 for 30,” and again that boosted my confidence enough to decide I’m going to do a feature narrative. And I was supported by my agency, and [producer] Jane Rosenthal has been an exceptional friend, and she produced “All We Had,” she encouraged me to do the “30 for 30.” So it was having people around me saying, “Go for it.” So here I am.

Guerrasio: When reading “All We Had,” did you get caught up with the story and characters or were you trying to figure out if this was a story you could direct?

Holmes: Well, when I read scripts and when I read books, it’s more of an emotional response and I was really drawn to these characters. The book was written from Ruthie’s perspective and I felt that there was a beautiful story to be told and one that was valuable and also one that was a size that I could do as my first.

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